Edvin Öhrström, Ariel

 Öhrström Ariel, 1951. Partly why the sharp zigzag pattern works so well is the roundness of the bowl which creates a dynamic contrast between form and decoration.  As a young painter and sculptor in Paris Öhrström was taught by both Legér, the fiercely avantgarde purist painter, and Despiau who embraced the archaic classical figure in antique sculpture. Two entirely different kinds of artists. It was a confusing experience.  Shortly after his time in Paris he was hired by Orrefors to work for Edward Hald where he became, in my opinion, their best artist working in the Ariel technique. As a painter/sculptor he is regarded as a peripheral figure in Swedish art history - and quite rightly so. The commissions he was granted later in life as sculptor, one has to admit, were based on his achievements at Orrefors. It is true his large sculptures were often made in glass, a difficult thus limiting material for a sculptor to work in, but they often lacked the immediacy and expressiveness of his best Ariels.  It was at Orrefors that Öhrström, then a young inexperienced painter and sculptor, was given the opportunity to work both in sculptural form  and  colour drawing from his experience as both painter and sculptor. The newly invented Ariel technique was the perfect medium to merge the thick sculptural glass object with a painterly modernist touch. Over the years Öhrström made both sketches for strictly geometric patterns with more than an echo of contemporary abstract art, such as this bowl, and also figurative cubist(esque) designs; the latter in a style somewhat reminiscent of Picasso and clearly borrowing from the Spaniards favourite repertoire of motifs such as the dove and the bull fighter.  Sold to a private collection.

Öhrström Ariel, 1951. Partly why the sharp zigzag pattern works so well is the roundness of the bowl which creates a dynamic contrast between form and decoration.

As a young painter and sculptor in Paris Öhrström was taught by both Legér, the fiercely avantgarde purist painter, and Despiau who embraced the archaic classical figure in antique sculpture. Two entirely different kinds of artists. It was a confusing experience.

Shortly after his time in Paris he was hired by Orrefors to work for Edward Hald where he became, in my opinion, their best artist working in the Ariel technique. As a painter/sculptor he is regarded as a peripheral figure in Swedish art history - and quite rightly so. The commissions he was granted later in life as sculptor, one has to admit, were based on his achievements at Orrefors. It is true his large sculptures were often made in glass, a difficult thus limiting material for a sculptor to work in, but they often lacked the immediacy and expressiveness of his best Ariels.

It was at Orrefors that Öhrström, then a young inexperienced painter and sculptor, was given the opportunity to work both in sculptural form and colour drawing from his experience as both painter and sculptor. The newly invented Ariel technique was the perfect medium to merge the thick sculptural glass object with a painterly modernist touch. Over the years Öhrström made both sketches for strictly geometric patterns with more than an echo of contemporary abstract art, such as this bowl, and also figurative cubist(esque) designs; the latter in a style somewhat reminiscent of Picasso and clearly borrowing from the Spaniards favourite repertoire of motifs such as the dove and the bull fighter.

Sold to a private collection.